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Feeling Bloated II: Report Outline

Name __________________

[Data Collection Log] [Report Outline] [Prediction Shee]
[Spreadsheet] [Evaluation Sheet] [Project Overview]

Report outline: (What should I turn in?)

PREDICTION: This is your best GUESS as to what will occur within the four days of the project. Look at the questions in the conclusions to help you develop your hypothesis. Fill out the prediction sheet. (Turned in today)

Data charts and pictures: Keep a careful log of your creature’s changes. Make drawings often as you collect your data. You must trace your creature before submerging it in water, twice while it is growing, when you take it out of the water to begin shrinking, and twice while it is shrinking.

Your Individual Graphs

  • Your data with a connected line graph (piecewise linear function) – one for length, one for width, and one for thickness. Have the computer draw another graph graphing the derivatives of your piecewise linear function. Determine the rates of change along the graph and add this information to the information in your spreadsheet.

Hypothesis Finish the statements below and email them/hand them in by Friday, January 5.

  • If these creatures are submerged in water, they will grow for _________ hours.
  • If these creatures are submerged in water, they will shrink for _________ hours.
  • If these creatures grow as big as possible, they will grow to be _____ % of their original size.
  • If these creatures shrink as small as possible, they will shrink back to be _____ % of their original size.

Your Class Graphs

  • The class data – one for growing data, one for shrinking data and find lines of best fit (length, width, and thickness). With these graphs explain how you graphed your data and why you decided to graph them this way. If you can graph the derivatives, you can get extra credit. (see extra credit listed below.)

Conclusion: Answer questions such as:

  • Was your prediction correct? If not, why not?
  • Did you take the creature out of the water before it was finished growing? What would make you think so?
  • Did your creature shrink any more after you stopped taking measurements?
  • What did this experiment have to do with rates of change?
  • What was the average rate of growth for your data? For the class data? How did you determine this?
  • What was the average rate of shrinking for your data? For the class data? How did you determine this?
  • How long did it grow? How long did it take to shrink? (your actual data vs. average data for the class)
  • Where in your data was the creature growing the slowest and how did you determine this? (rate of growth is slowest) How did you determine this?
  • Where in your data was the creature growing the fastest and how did you determine this? (rate of growth is fastest) How did you determine this?
  • Where in your data was the creature shrinking the slowest and how did you determine this? (rate of decay is slowest) How did you determine this?
  • Where in your data was the creature shrinking the fastest and how did you determine this? (rate of decay is fastest) How did you determine this?
  • Did it shrink back to its original size? If not, how much smaller than the original or larger than the original was the final measurement?
  • Were the creatures truly similar at all stages of its growth or shrinking? How did you know and why was it important?
  • Were your hypotheses correct? Note where on your graph(s) you proved or disproved each of them.
  • What interesting things did you observe and learn during this project?

Reflections: If you were to do this experiment over or design it differently, what would you change? What other things could you try that might make it more interesting? Do you think that the shapes of the creatures made any difference on how they grew/shrunk?

EXTRA Credit:

  • After your reflections in your report, add a section called Applications of Rates of Change. Describe up to two different real-world situations where rates of change would be crucial to know. Tell what the application is, where or in what industry it would be important, how the rates would be measured – include units used, and who would use this information. (10 points possible for each application – 20 points maximum.)
  • Add derivative graphs for your class data. (20 points maximum)

 


[Data Collection Log] [Report Outline] [Prediction Shee]
[Spreadsheet] [Evaluation Sheet] [Project Overview]

 

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