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Impact II: Projects & Lesson Plans: Entrepreneurship and Everyday Technology
Entrepreneurship and Everyday Technology

HOW IT WORKS
In Entrepreneurship and Everyday Technology, students, under the facilitation of a business education teacher, create and run a business using technology to bring a hand-made product to market. Potential products include scented soaps, picture frames, decoupage boxes, or chocolates. The students work individually as well as cooperatively in pairs and in small groups. They learn principles of marketing, advertising, research, and bookkeeping as well as everyday computer applications, and create business cards, brochures and flyers, and even write advertising jingles.

When the class begins, the teacher assesses the individual skills of the students and pairs them up to help refine their computer skills as well as discover unique talents that might come to bear on the student-chosen projects (for example, if a student is discovered to have a talent for drawing, the class can encourage him/her to create a logo or visual ad campaign for this project). The students work on computers together, reciprocally teaching. Those with advanced skills can explore more complex levels of design and graphs and charts. Beginner-level students learn the basics and create simpler designs. All are expected to participate and create, and are judged not competitively, but by individual effort and participation as well as their ability and desire to work as part of a team. Accountability is a large part of the criteria for accomplishment.

THE STUDENTS
A maximum of twenty-five students and a minimum of ten can participate in this program per term. Prior technological experience is not necessary, but it helps to have students familiar with basic computer skills. Ideally, students meet in a computer lab, but they can also use some class time in another room with work tables.

THE STAFF
Allison Witty has a teaching background in business, marketing, and math. She has run mathematics workshops for the Manhattan Superintendent’s office and has also conducted business workshops in her school.

WHAT YOU NEED
The ideal setup is for the class to have time in a computer lab. Each semester, about $300.00 covers the cost of supplies to make the products that are sold.

OVERALL VALUE
In Entrepreneurship and Everyday Technology, students develop and increase their sense of involvement because they actually participate in the process from its inception to the final realization of their goals. They choose a product that they will research and for which they will gather resources, create, and then learn the requisite skills to commit themselves to owning and operating that business. This program has proven to be an asset to the entire school community as those not involved in the program reap the benefits by purchasing products made and/or made available by the student employees. It brings a sense of community and improved morale of staff, administration, and students.

 

View the Curriculum Unit/Dissemination Packet

CURRICULUM AREAS
Business
Technology

GRADES
10-12

MORE INFORMATION

Allison Witty
Louis D. Brandeis High School
145 West 84th Street
New York, NY 100
allisonmw@hotmail.com
Principal
Dr. Eloise Messineo

IMPACT II 
Catalog 2003-2004

 

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