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A Survival Guide for Teaching Students How to Write Research Papers

About this Daily Classroom Special:
A Survival Guide for Teaching Students How to Write Research Papers was written  by former Teachers Network web mentor, Lisa Kihn, a math and language arts teacher at Nevin Platt Middle School in Boulder, Colorado.


A Survival Guide for Teaching Students How to Write Research Papers


Project Overview

Appropriate for grades 5 -7

  • Cover page with picture and title
  • Introduction
    • catches the reader’s attention
    • uses images
    • general statement about the topic
    • power statement 
      (A power statement is a type of topic sentence that involves numbers or a number word: “There are three national monuments in Washington, D.C., that I will describe.” “There are several reasons to vote against this amendment.”) 
    • explains your interest
    • definition
  • Paper divided into 3 or 4 subtopics or categories
  • Topic sentences
    • each paragraph needs a topic sentence
  • Supporting Sentences
    • all sentences within the paragraph support the topic sentence
  • Flow
    • each category contains enough information
    • categories placed in such a way that the information flows well and makes sense
  • Conclusion
    • sums up the most important or exciting aspect learned
    • contains a final image
  • Resources
    • must have at least one primary resource (an interview) and five secondary resources (books)
      Quotes
    • at least one direct quote from an interview
     
  • Notecards
    • 15 to 20 per category (one idea per notecard)
     
  • Bibliography 
  • Visuals
    • at least one per category (pictures, graphs, maps, etc)
     
  • Presentation
    • present to class, include a large display and a teaching activity
     
  • Self and Peer Editing


To the Daily Lesson Plans
To the Topic Commitment Forms
To the Speech Preparation Sheet
To the Research Paper Self-Evaluation

 

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