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DREAM STREETS

Sixth grade students use web-based resources to learn the principles of drawing using one and two point perspective. The project culminates in an animated drawing of their own “dream street” accompanied by their writing about their dream street.

Session 1

Sixth graders are introduced to the Vocabulary of Perspective Drawing at http://homeschoolarts.com/per-l1-1.htm

With a pencil, straightedge, and notebook or unlined paper, the class follows the step-by-step lesson for drawing a cube in one-point perspective at http://homeschoolarts.com/per-l1-2.htm

HW – teacher prints out handout for drawing a street scene using one-point perspective at:

http://sanford-artedventures.com/teach/lp_1pt_handout.html

Student completes handout for homework.

Session 2

Students view a teacher’s animated lesson of drawing using perspective

http://olejarz.com/arted/perspective/

With a pencil, straightedge, and notebook or unlined paper, the class follows the step-by-step lesson for drawing a street scene using two-point perspective at

http://geocities.com/~jlhagan/K9-14/draw_one.htm

For homework, each student looks out their own window, and tries to draw their street in one point perspective.

Session 3

Students view street scenes by artist Edward Hopper at http://ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/hopper/street/

Individually or in teams of two, they identify where the vanishing point(s) are (or would be), and whether the image uses one or two point perspective. In their notebook, they recreate one of the Hopper images.

For homework, they add their own elements, in perspective, to the Hopper scene.

Session 4

Students view photographs of NYC street scenes at http://aidan.co.uk/photos14-Streets.php

Individually or in teams of two, they identify where the vanishing point(s) are (or would be). Then the students view images of Main Street USA in Disneyland at http://disneylandpostcards.com/MainStreet.html

Elicit from students a list of what is realistic about Main Street, Disneyland. Elicit from the students what is a “fantasy,” a fabrication of the imagination or dream come true about Main Street, Disneyland.

Homework: Each student brainstorms a dream street of his or her own. They write a description of their dream street.

Sessions 5-6

Students are introduced to animation drawing using Flash or any another animation program (such as Hyperstudio, Adobe Image Ready)

Homework: Students sketch their dream street, using one or two point perspective. Students keep track of how many steps they take in creating their drawing (e.g., each line drawn is one step).

Sessions 7-9 Production phase. Students re-create their dream streets using an animation program, such as Macromedia Flash. Students strive to break down the animations into one step at a time sequences, so the viewers can see how they used one or two point perspective techniques to create their drawings.

Completed animations are saved in web compatible format (.swf for Flash, .gif for Image Ready)

Sessions 10-11

Students use a web-authoring program such as Dream Weaver, to create web pages incorporating their dream street animations and writing.

The students use Dream Weaver’s spell check command to review and correct their text.

The completed web pages are tested on a web browser before uploading the projects to the Internet. 

 

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