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TeachNet NYC: Lesson Plans

GIF Animation

Project URL:
http://teachers.ithsnyc.org/
landerson/ANIMATION/tutorial.htm

How it works:
In this program, students learn how to make GIF animations using Photoshop and Image Ready software. GIF stands for "Graphics Interchange Format,"  but the process is much easier than it initially sounds. The GIF format stores multiple frames of illustration that give the appearance of movement  when the frames are displayed individually. GIF animation is most often seen in those often-annoying Internet pop-up ads, but the format can be put to a much more constructive--and enjoyable--use! The first project is very simple--making an animated bouncing ball. The assignments get progressively more difficult as students add backgrounds and work with several layers of color. The students really enjoy this format because they don't have to be artists to create these illustrations.

Standards addressed:  
Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity. They collaborate in constructing technology-enhanced models, prepare publications, and produce other creative works.

Materials used: 
At least one computer with an Internet connection and Photoshop and Image Ready software is needed.

The students:
Students of all abilities from sixth grade and up would enjoy this program. Students who learn fast can continue the lessons at their own pace. 

Overall value:
GIF Animation enables students to be creative while engaging in a difficult process. Students are highly motivated since the end product is so satisfying.

Tips: 
Don't be afraid to experiment and allow the students to alter the assignments. This program requires some bravery, since most teachers do not know this topic very well. Take the risk!  The kids will love it and forgive any lack of expertise. (There are various Internet site that supply information and ideas on this subject.) When working with computers, make sure the students save their work often.



   

About the teacher:
Laura Anderson is a Math/Computer teacher at West Side High School, an
alternative school in New York City. Laura has a bachelors degree in business and a master's degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Houston. She is a fully certified NYS Math Teacher and has been teaching for 20 years.



E-mail:
LauraJaneAnders@aol.com

Subject Areas: 
Math
Technology

Grade Levels: 
6-12

 

 

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