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New Teachers New York:
Lesson Plans by New Teachers, For New Teachers
How Hungry Is Your Grouchy Ladybug? 

Standards
Benchmark 1. Identifies simple problems and possible solutions (e.g., ways to make something work better) Knowledge/skill statements
1) Identifies simple problems
2) Identifies possible solutions Respond to literacy.

Created by: Anna Tattan 
Location: PS 40
Grade: kindergarten
Subject: Math, English

If you have any questions regarding this activity, please contact anna.tattan@gmail.com

Objective
Students will use their prior knowledge of The Grouchy Ladybug to help them   create a mathematical story problem using the grouchy ladybug and the aphids  that are to be eaten. Students will work independently to create their own story problem. Student will respond to the story problems of their classmates.

Aim
Students will use their prior knowledge of The Grouchy Ladybug to help them  create a mathematical story problem using the grouchy ladybug and the aphids   that are to be eaten. Students will work independently to create their own story problem. Student will respond to the story problems of their classmates.

Vocabulary
Addition, Plus

Procedures
Read The Grouchy Ladybug to the students. Even though they know and love the book, reviewing will not hurt. The idea of mathematical story problems should  have already been introduced. Students will work on creating their own story problems using the grouchy ladybug and the aphids. As a class, create a story problem. One example: the grouchy ladybug saw two aphids sitting on the leaf and ate them. Still hungry, the ladybug ate two more. How many aphids did the  ladybug eat in all? Students would figure out the answer, turn and talk to a  neighbor, and then discuss as a class. Students would have time to share their ideas for a story problem. Given enough time to discuss and map out ideas on white paper, students would begin their independent work. Given a red oval and two green ovals, students would decorate their ladybug (adding a face and coloring in the dots) and leaf (color white lines with crayons). Students would then construct their story problems by placing the black dots on their leaves (two  dots on one leaf, three on another, for example). Students would complete the activity by drawing the solution on the ladybug.

Activities       
Decorating the red oval to make a ladybug, decorating the green ovals to make leaves, and finally adding the aphids to create a story problem.

Extension
Students share their story problems with a partner. One partner shows the two leaves with aphids, telling the story along the way, and the other partner tries to solve the problem. The student can check his/her answer by looking at the ladybug with the correct answer.

Homework
Students bring their ladybugs home to share their story problems with their  family.

Evaluation  
Assess students by listening to their story problem and being sure the solution has  been added correctly (and that the student can explain the solution).

Students
The activity is for students of a younger age, but can be adapted for any age level. The students involved are students who need many visuals and who learn best with hands-on activities.

Overall Value
Having students create their own story problems gives them the opportunity to express their creativity, as they so often desire to do. Students love decorating and creating, and being able to share their work with their family and classmates is an honor for them.

About 
Anna Tattan is a first-year kindergarten teacher in Brooklyn. She moved from Michigan to reach out to children with backgrounds different from her own, and she has discovered more challenges than ever imagined. Teaching has been a trial and error process and continues to be a work in progress.

 

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