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New Teachers New York:
Lesson Plans by New Teachers, For New Teachers
A Temple Fit for a God(dess!) 

Aim:
To work in groups to apply students' knowledge of Greek architecture towards building a temple for a Greek God or Goddess of their choice.

Objectives:
Students will be able to work in groups to draw both a birds' eye and front view of a Greek temple for the God or Goddess of their choice. They will use the D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths to choose their God or Goddess.

Vocabulary Concepts:
Acropolis, Pericles, Parthenon, Columns (Dorian, Ionic and Classic)

Procedures:
Students will take notes on Pericles' reconstruction of Athens, the Acropolis, and the Parthenon and understand the importance to the Ancient Greeks of creating temples worthy of their Gods.

Activities:
Students will split up into groups, choose their God or Goddess from the D'Aulaires. book and read the myth about their chosen God or Goddess. Each group will then create a plan for their temple on 81/2 x 11 white paper. They will create a bird's eye view of the temple, a front view of the temple and a list of the features the temple possesses that would be pleasing to their God(dess). They will be prepared to explain why these features were included. After their blueprints are made, the groups will create a final version on larger white or beige construction paper.

Extension/Follow-up:
The students will present their completed temples the next day in class, pointing out features and explaining the reasons they chose them. They must also give background information on their chosen God or Goddess and then illustrate how their temple is specifically designed to meet the needs and desires of that God or Goddess.

Homework:
Use any resource (e.g., library, internet, dictionary, encyclopedia) to look up "Hippocrates." Try to answer the Who What Where When Why and How questions about this man. His life and importance will be explored in class as a follow-up.

Evaluation:
Student groups will present their finished temples to the class. Class will evaluate each presentation according to a rubric.

Standards Addressed:
This lesson conforms to NYC Social Studies Scope and Sequence regarding the study of the culture of Ancient Civilizations. It also meets National NCSS themes such as People, Places and Ideas.

  • Civilizations and cultures of the Eastern Hemisphere (China, India, Greece, and Rome) are explored through the arts and sciences, key documents, and other important artifacts.
  • The civilizations and cultures of the Eastern Hemisphere have contributed important ideas, traditions, religions, and other beliefs to the history of humankind.
  • Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of culture and cultural diversity.
  • Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of interactions among Individuals, Groups, and Institutions.

Students:
This lesson was presented to a gifted class, but I believe any 6th grade SS teacher could use it during their study of the Ancient Greeks.

Overall Value:
This lesson was successful because it requires the students to consider themselves artists even if they might not normally do so. Also, each child has input and an active role in creating the project.

Teacher Tips:
Make sure you have students who will work together well in the same group.

Created by:
Ryan Michele Healey 
Location: MS 51
Grade: 6th Grade
Subject: Social Studies
Subject Area 2: Arts, Design, Planning and Orchestration.

Ryan Michele Healey teaches sixth grade ELA and SS at M.S 51 in Park Slope. She is also a NYC Teaching Fellow and Pace University graduate student.

If you have any questions regarding this activity, please e-mail Ryan Michele Healey at: raingrapes@aol.com 

 

 

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