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Design by
Lisa Dempsey

 

Impact II: Projects & Lesson Plans: Attraction in Action

Attraction in Action

HOW IT WORKS
Attraction in Action is a science/technology program appropriate for the third through fifth grade. Through a series of three hands-on discovery lessons and one computer-aided research lesson, the students develop a better understanding of magnets and their use in their everyday lives. In one lesson, students test different types of quantities of fabrics and papers in order to block magnetic force. They also see if water can block the force. 

THE STUDENTS
A total of 54 third grade students in two separate classes participated in this program. Both classes functioned above grade level, have been aided in their technological skills by the library/media teacher, and meet with the science teacher weekly for a 50-minute period. The three hands-on lessons occurred in the classroom. The technology lesson occurred in the library. This program can easily be adapted for older students who have a background in magnetism. The reading level is quite high for the research component so that lesson could be modified for those students that are not strong readers.  

THE STAFF
Teresa Caliari Olya has been teaching for over 15 years and has taught Attraction In Action for three years. She has previously won an IMPACT II award, received five mini-grants from the UFT, three grants from Common Cents, a Dr. Mary J. Leou Excellence in Science Teaching Award, and grants from donorschoose.org, the Staten Island Rotary, and the Staten Island Reading Association. She is also the 2002 borough winner and the 2001 citywide winner of the Department of Sanitation’s Golden Apple Award in the Trashmasters Reduce and Reuse category. 

WHAT YOU NEED
Depending on the amount of materials, students work in groups of two to four in the classroom. You will need class sets of several types of magnets – ring, bar, mini-horseshoe, and ball. You will also need objects to test, but you should be able to gather them from around the classroom or your home. Iron filings, magnet carts (from Delta Education), compasses, string, rulers, papers, and fabrics of various thicknesses complete the necessary items. 

OVERALL VALUE
This program is very discovery-orientated, as the student learning is the result of actually doing and acting out the questions that need to be answered. The students answer the question “How strong is a magnet?” by adding more layers of cardboard or another layer of flannel in an effort to block its force. Children don’t just hear that the Earth is a magnet—they can prove it! The technology lesson complements the hands-on activities by showing how magnets are used today and providing background material in a better manner than through lectures. After the initial outlay, the program is relatively economical and the children have a great time as they are learning!

 

View the Curriculum Unit/Dissemination Packet

CURRICULUM AREAS
Science
Technology

GRADES
3-5

 

MORE INFORMATION

Teresa Caliari Olya
P.S. 22
1860 Forest Avenue
Staten Island, NY 10303
teri@galexo.com
Principal
Karina Costantino

IMPACT II 
Catalog 2003-2004

 

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