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Impact II: Projects & Lesson Plans: Computer Graphics: An Introduction to PhotoShop

HOW IT WORKS
Computer Graphics was originally designed as an adjunct to already-existing art courses. Its primary goal is to enable all students, regardless of their natural artistic abilities or skills, to express themselves in a technologically based visual manner.

Projects such as story illustration or postal stamp design encourage each of the participants to conduct  their own interdisciplinary research in order to make a visual statement. While approaching solutions individually to achieve their given project’s goals, the students learn how to use the various tools and techniques of the computer graphics program
PhotoShop. 

The students keep a daily journal to encourage language mastery and to reflect their own ideas and concerns. As an enhancement, they are encouraged to openly discuss the role of visual media in society, using resources such as advertising and visits to local museums. An outgrowth of the museum visit is a broadening of their awareness through art history, whether past or contemporary. It is also of great benefit for students to maintain and build an image
library for the classroom.

Since the course began, student attendance and involvement has proliferated. This is because the computer is a non-threatening vehicle for expression. It has also demonstrated additional avenues of promise for the career-oriented student, whether mainstream or a recipient of special education.

THE STUDENTS
Initially designed for the high school student, the course works well for almost every grade level that is mature enough to operate a keyboard and remember the step-by-step process of accomplishing computer tasks. The writing components, such as the journals or essay sections given while testing, greatly benefit the students’ literacy skills.


THE STAFF
Lowell Shaw developed the curriculum for this course in 1998. A Special Education teacher for 15 years in Brooklyn, New York, Mr. Shaw was also the recipient of a Disseminator Grant in 1989 for Airbrush, a painting course designed for the Special Education population. Mr. Shaw holds a BFA degree from Pratt Institute and an MSE from the College of Staten Island. He is the author of several articles for Airbrush
Action, a national arts magazine, and has had numerous paintings published for the decor industry. Mr. Shaw, aside from his teaching responsibilities, is currently developing a portfolio of paintings for the non-commercial arts arena.


WHAT YOU NEED
Computer Graphics requires a 486 or higher PC with CD-ROM drive (IBM or Mac), a color printer, a scanner, and, of course, the Adobe PhotoShop software. Only one printer and scanner are needed per classroom. Internet access can be of great benefit, especially when a student wishes to download imagery or research a topic. A digital camera is desirable, but optional. A visit to a local museum or gallery is of great benefit. Guest speakers can include artists or those in the graphic arts industry. These individuals often further a student’s understanding of the importance of the arts and artistic vocations. 

OVERALL VALUE
As stated previously, student involvement grows exponentially, and literacy and interdisciplinary involvement strategies are strengthened. Students who have demonstrated language learning difficulties will find this course especially helpful. It affords great promise for personal and academic growth. 

Lowell Shaw's
Dissemination Packet

(pdf file: requires Adobe Acrobat Reader).

CURRICULUM AREAS
Art
Technology
Writing


GRADES
Middle School
High School


MORE INFORMATION
Lowell Shaw
Roosevelt High School
5800 20th Avenue
Brooklyn, New York 11204
718-256-1346


Airshaw@earthlink.net

IMPACT II Catalog 2000-2001
(pdf file: requires Adobe Acrobat Reader)
.

 

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