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The Trail of Tears

Subject: Technology, Literature, Social Studies

Grade Level: 7

Materials: Computers with Internet capabilities and Microsoft Word, Power Point, TimeLiner, MapMaker, and VideoStreaming software; a printer, projector, overhead, floppy disk/flash drive, and stopwatch; and the book The Light in the Forest by Conrad Richter

About: The students are assigned to a collaborative learning group to research different facets of the Cherokee Indians, including their removal, known as the Trail of Tears, and present their findings using a multimedia presentation format.

The students present a 5-10 minute oral presentation with the support of a variety of computer resources. They may utilize: TimeLiner to create a timeline of events describing the hardships during the Trail of Tears; PowerPoint to create a presentation explaining the history and present day Cherokee Indians; or Mapmaker to create a map using today's state boundaries to highlight the different trails.

In this project, students discover each other's assets and utilize them to contribute to the group presentation. They learn about the plight of the Cherokee Indian and how to incorporate technology into an oral presentation. The students complete their research via the Internet, downloading appropriate materials including music, pictures and maps.

This is a great cross-curricular learning experience where students control part of the class's learning. There is a vast amount of materials to incorporate and different opportunities to have each student's talent highlighted. I met each group in a "pow-wow" where we discussed the possibilities for their presentation.

 Objectives
The students research the plight of the Chrokee Indians and the role of the United States government in removing them from their native lands.
The students read the historical fiction novel The Light in the Forest by Conrad Richter to enhance the learning experience and further their understanding of the time period.
The students practice their word processing and Internet skills such as narrowing searches, copying, pasting, downloading, jpegs and wav files, toggling between windows, highlighting, and printing.
The students collaborate as a group, accentuating individual strengths such as creativity, leadership, speaking, and technological abilities.
The students relate the impact and hardships of the Cherokee Indians and compare this to other ethnic groups' hardships.

Websites
Here you can find timelines, maps, statistics, first-hand accounts of the trail, legends, stories, recipes, and links to other Cherokee sites.
http://rosecity.net/tears/
At this site, you can learn about the history of the Cherokee Indians from before the European settlers to the mid-1800s. There are links to books and Cherokee newspapers.
http://cherokeehistory.com/
This is the official site for the present-day Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. It shares news stories, employment opportunities, and links to their culture.
http://cherokeehistory.org/
This is a geneology site where you can read about the history of the Chreokee Indians and view maps, treaties, and timelines.
http://rootsweb.com/~itcherok/resource.htm
This is a webquest that my students use as a resource to the lifestyle of the Cherokee Indians including tribal dancing, recipes, clothing, and contributions to society.
http://catawba.k12.nc.us/techtrac/plus/taylor/outline.htm

Standards
Students read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. As listeners and readers, students collect data, facts, and ideas; discover relationships, concepts, and generalizations; and use knowledge generated from oral, written, and electronically produced texts. As speakers and writers, they use oral and written language to acquire, interpret, apply, and transmit information.
Intermediate
ELA
Students read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction, and use oral and written language for effective social communication with a wide variety of people. As readers and listeners, they use the social communications of others to enrich their understanding of people and their views.
Intermediate
ELA
Students use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York State.
Intermediate
Social Studies
Students use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the necessity for establishing governments; the governmental system of the United States and other nations; the United States Constitution; the basic civic values of American constitutional democracy; and the roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizenship, including avenues of participation.
Intermediate
Social Studies
Computers, as tools for design, modeling, information processing, communication, and system control, have greatly increased human productivity and knowledge.
Intermediate
Technology

Day 1: Introduction
Objectives
The students meet with their assigned groups and discuss how they will proceed with their question for the project.
The students begin to research facts and create a Hot List of any sites they think they will need for the project.
Materials
Computers with Internet capabilities, Microsoft Word, note paper, pen/pencil, floppy disk/flash drive
Procedures
In their groups, the students read their questions and brainstorm their ideas on how to creatively present their projects.
Each student has a computer to begin preliminary reseach and create a Hot List of websites they think will help answer the question for their project. A Hot List is a list of websites copied & pasted into Microsoft Word (and hyperlinked) and include a breif description of what information is on that site.
As the teacher, I meet with each group in a "pow-wow" to help facilitate the groups direction for the project.
At close of class, each group bookmarks any necessary site and save their Hot List.
Homework
There is no written homework, but students must be prepared at the end of the next class to decide what format their project will be completed in.
Assessment
The students are assessed as a group by listening and collaborating together. Their mark is an effort and conduct grade.

Day 2: Presentation Planning
Objectives
The students have enough research to begin to develop their multimedia presentation.
The students continue to narrow their research on the Internet.
Materials
Computers with Internet capabilities and Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, TimeLiner, Mapmaker software, note papaer, pen/pencil, floppy disk/flash drive
Procedures
In groups, the students log onto the Internet to research their project question and create a Hot List of websites.
I hold a "pow-wow" with each group to brainstorm how they will present their project and what multimedia format would work best for their question.
The students have the opportunity to work on their presentation in the appropriate software (PowerPoint, TimeLiner, Word, Mapmaker)
Homework
At the close of class, the students have no written homework, but are encouraged to continue researching their project question. In both Social Studies and LIterature, the students are assigned wiritten homework, which incorporates facts for this project.
Assessment
The stuents are assessed as a group by listening and collaborating together. Their mark is an effort and conduct grade.

Day 3: Presentations take Shape!
Objectives
The students work their select multimedia software to create a presentation for their project question.
The students download pictures, maps, and music, as needed, for their projects.
Materials
Computers with Internet capabilitiesand Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, TimeLiner, Word, and Mapmaker software, floppy disk/flash drive
Procedures
The students continue to work on their presentation in the appropriate software (PowerPoint, TimeLiner, Word, Mapmaker)
I hold a "pow-wow" with each group to ensure the students are answering the question for their project and what multimedia format would work best for their question.
Homework
Continue research at home, if necessary.
Assessment
The students are assessed as a group by listening and collaborating together. Their mark is an effort and conduct grade.

Day 4: Final Touch Ups
Objectives
The students complete their projects and begin to prepare for their oral presentations.
Materials
Computers with Internet capabilities and Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, TimeLiner, Word, and Mapmaker software, floppy disk/flash drive, stopwatch, printer
Procedures
The students break into their groups and complete their multimedia presentation.
In today's "pow-wow," I view each presentation and add critiques to where they could enhance or improve the final project.
Each group prepares and prints a script and decides who will present the different parts of the presentation.
Homework
The students rehearse their presentations.
Assessment
They receive a grade on their projects using a rubric.

Day 5: Presentation Day!
Objectives
The students present their projects by group.
Materials
Completed project, computer, projector, and assessment rubric (for teacher)
Procedures
Each group presents their project.
At the end of each presentation, there is an opportunity for question and answers.
As a follow-up, the students complete an analysis report on their learning experience and the effort of the group.
Homework
Assessment
Each student is graded on the research, oral presentation, and overall project.

Tara Sottnik

HnameofM@optonline.net

Holy Name of Mary School
90 South Grove Street
Valley Stream, NY 11580

Tara Sottnik has been the Computer Teacher and Technology Coordinator at Holy Name of Mary School for 9 years. Last year, Tara was recognized in Who's Who Among America's Teachers. She attend many conferences and workshops to stay current with technology and bring new learning experiences to her students.


Important documents for this lesson plan.

TheTrailofTears.doc
rubric.JPG
TheIndianRemovalActof18302.ppt

 

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