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Profiles of Famous Women: Wilma Rudolph

About This Daily Classroom Special

Profiles of Famous Women was written by Michael Cawthra, teacher at Kyffin Elementary School, Golden (CO) and former Teachers Network web mentor. 

March is Women's History Month!
Read about the accomplishments of these famous women.

Wilma Rudolph

Wilma Rudolph

No one represents the triumph of a person over adversity better than Wilma Rudolph. Ms. Rudolph contracted polio at the age of four. The doctors didn't feel she would walk without a large amount of physical therapy. Her mother proceeded to give her all the therapy she could for five years. When doctors said she would be lucky to walk again, Ms. Rudolph worked hard and finally not only walked, but began running.

She never stopped until in 1960, at the Rome Olympics, Ms. Rudolph won two individual medals in the 100- and 200-meter races. She also anchored the 4x100 relay and won gold in that event as well. After retiring in 1962, she married and in 1981 founded the Wilma Rudolph Foundation for the training of young athletes. For all people, Ms. Rudolph remains a model of courage and persistence against all odds.


Test Your Knowlege - Take the Quizes

A Salute to Famous Women I

A Salute to Famous Women II

 

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