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Tour Home: How to use the Internet in Your Classroom
Tour Home: The New Teacher Handbook
How to Use the Internet in the Classroom: We Built this City: A Study of Platonic Solids


Linda Kuzyk

Crescent Park School
Bethel, ME

E-mail Linda

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We Built This City: A Study of Platonic Solids

 
Linda Kuzyk shares her experience in creating her first WebQuest

My introduction to WebQuests came about as the result of a WebQuest incentive offered at the state level, with a focus on math or science. WebQuests that met the predetermined criteria would be honored with a financial award and posted to the web for other teachers to use. I had never done a WebQuest, but it sounded like a great way to use the Internet in my classroom, so I took on the challenge. As it turned out, my first WebQuest took me far longer than I had anticipated - I had to first research, read, and gather data and ideas. The more I worked on it, however, the more I realized what a great teaching, learning, and assessment tool a WebQuest could be. It was all right there, in an organized framework. By the time I was finished, I was hooked. I really wanted to invest major energy into constructing more of them.

The part of the WebQuest adventure that speaks to me the loudest is the students' enthusiasm. It's a tremendous motivator. .

From this point on, I plan on finding, bookmarking, and "tweaking" as many WebQuests as possible for my classroom use. I will also continue to create them. At some point, soon, I will ask to be on the agenda of a faculty meeting in my school to share my knowledge, enthusiasm, and experience with others.


 

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