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Technology and the New Teacher: TV/VCR

About this Daily Classroom Special
Technology and the New Teacher is designed to introduce you to the topics, successes, and pitfalls of technology in the classroom. It was written by Buzz Eyler, a Teachers Network web mentor who has been leading in-service training in technology use for the past 12 years. 

(Note: This page was written in 1999. Some information may be dated.)

TV/VCR

We begin with the most familiar technology to us all: the TV and VCR. Combined they are a very powerful teaching and learning tool.

First, if you are in a district that has access to cable, insist it be dropped into your room. Such programs as the Weather Channel, NOVA, the Discovery Channel, PBS and the History Channel, to name a few, carry timely and quality programming. Although the programs may not be broadcast at a time when you have students in the room, you do have the rights to copy them for your classroom. Be sure to erase them after using.

Don't forget the news channels, also. CNN, Public Access and the Business Reports may all fit into your lesson plans.

While cable by itself is very important to a technology rich classroom, a VCR and/or camcorder which CAN record must also be present. Play back only machines are not sufficient. Let me elaborate.

The real power of any technology is the ability to use it to create for others. By having a play-back only VCR, you can only show to the students what someone else has created. While there are definitely times when this is appropriate, it precludes you and your students from making video productions. And I am not talking about movies.

Consider using the VCR for:

* Recording speeches and projects.

* Reading stories for the students to take home.

* Demonstrating a principle.

* Singing a song/choral reading to share with parents

* Keeping a record of student work

Don't let this exciting piece of technology gather dust in some closet. Get out the camera, VCR and TV to challenge your students to do something other than fill in the blanks of a worksheet.

Introduction
Basics
Advanced Topics
Curriculum Development
E-mail
Graphics
Internet
LAN/WANs
Mac vs IBM
Printers & Copiers
Software
Students
TV/VCR
Word Processing

 

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