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Tour Home: How to use the Internet in Your Classroom
Tour Home: The New Teacher Handbook
How to Use the Internet in Your Classroom: The Key to Creating a Great Internet Lesson Plan

Tracey Melandro

East Northport Middle School
Northport, NY 

E-mail Tracey


Purchase from our Online Store: How to Use the Internet in Your Classroom 

 

The Keys to Creating a Great Internet Lesson Plan. 

  1. Find a topic and decide what you and your students want to learn about it.

  2. Prepare a list of web sites in advance. Use search engines to find appropriate web sites for your project.

  3. Design tasks to complete at each web site. Identify the site clearly on your worksheet, and have students write answers to the questions you have created from each site. 

  4. Develop a valid assessment of the entire project. Share your evaluation rubric or guide with the students before beginning the project.

  5. Review the material on each site carefully. Check all links and make sure they are appropriate. 

  6. Do the assignment yourself. Make checkpoints for each day's work as well as a realistic time schedule for completion.

  7. Always have a list of web sites for students who finish early. There are many valid and fun sites for the early finishers to explore on their own. They can also be given extra credit for completing an additional assignment that you have prepared in advance.

 

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